surviving-an-active-shooter-event

 

Surviving an Active Shooter Event

 

Active Shooter events are on the rise. Patrick Henry Sherrill started the horror when he went “Postal” at an Edmond, OK Post Office in 1986. Fast-forward to now, with the biggest terrorist attack on US soil since 911 in San Bernardino, CA, the threat is at an all time high.


What would you do to survive an active shooter event?

This video, produced by the Houston Mayor’s Office of Public Safety and Homeland Security, dramatizes an active shooter incident in the workplace. Its purpose is to educate the public on how to respond during such an incident.
Warning: The initial sequence in this video may be disturbing.

 

Video

 

Video Copyright © 2012 City of Houston

SafetyU and our development partners are the process of developing a training video similar to the one above but more in-depth and with testing. Let’s all do everything within our power to keep our employees, families and ourselves safe.

 

 

 

Slips, Trips and Falls: Winter Tips
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Winter season slip and fall claims doubled over the previous year and accounted for 29% of all Worker's Comp. Claims.
 
Slippery building entrances, icy parking lots, and snowy walkways can lead to serious injuries if you’re not careful. This safety tip video offers tips for reducing the chance of injury during the winter months.
From icy parking lots to slippery building entrances, slip hazards multiply when cold weather hits.
 

To help avoid injury when walking on ice and snow here are some simple tips:

 

Winter season slip and fall claims doubled over the previous year and accounted for 29% of all Worker's Comp. Claims.
 
Slippery building entrances, icy parking lots, and snowy walkways can lead to serious injuries if you’re not careful. This safety tip video offers tips for reducing the chance of injury during the winter months.
From icy parking lots to slippery building entrances, slip hazards multiply when cold weather hits.
 

To help avoid injury when walking on ice and snow here are some simple tips:

 


     
Try to avoid slippery surfaces altogether, when possible.


     
Take the safest route to your destination and make the time for it.

 

 

     
Don't rush.


Use hand rails along the way when possible.

 

     
Don’t use your smart phone while walking.

 

     
Walk deliberately.


     
Bending your knees a little, taking slow and short steps, and keep your center of balance under you increases traction and lowers the odds of falling.

 


Wear boots or other slip resistant footwear.


Look out for black ice. Dew, fog, or water vapor can freeze on cold services and form extra thin, nearly invisible, layer of ice that can look like a wet spot on the pavement. It often shows up early in the morning or in the areas that are shaded from sun.


Use caution when getting in and out of vehicle and use the vehicle for support.

 

When entering a building, remove as much snow and water from your boots as you can.

 

Avoid carrying items. Keep hands empty so your arms are free for stabilization. If you must carry items, use a backpack if possible.

 


When walking on steps, always used the handrail and plant your feet firmly on each step.

 
Until next time, spread the word and stay safe.


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winter-driving-safety

 

Winter Driving Safety
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On average, 6,250 people are killed in weather-related crashes, and another 480,000 are injured.
 
The Federal Highway Administration reported that weather-related crashes account for 23% of all vehicle crashes each year.  That means 1 million car crashes are directly related to adverse weather conditions.
 
Winter driving can be hazardous, especially when seasonal ice and snow can impact travel. But additional preparation can help you travel safely and equip you to deal with winter roadside emergencies.
 

To help stay safe when driving in winter conditions, here are some simple tips:

 

Maintain your vehicle:

     
Check your tire pressure, battery, windshield wipers and make sure that your windows are clear.

 

      
Be sure to put No-Freeze fluid in your windshield wiper reservoir.

     
Check your antifreeze.              

 

Items to have in your vehicle:


     
A flashlight, jumper cables, abrasive material (like sand for traction), shovel, window scraper, warning devices (like flares), and a blanket. 


      
For long trips add food, water, and medication it necessary. 

    

If you get stuck or your car won't start:

     
Don't panic.  Stay with your car and don't over exert yourself.

    
Put bright markers on your antenna and windows or use other means to signal that you need assistance.

    
If you are stuck and if your vehicle is fully functioning check and clear the exhaust pipe and run your vehicle just long enough to stay warm.

 

Plan your route:


     
Check the weather ahead of time and pay attention to changing weather conditions. 


      
Allow plenty of time for your trip, preferably during daylight. 

    
Be familiar with directions and maps and let others know your root and expected arrival time. 

 

In addition:


     
Always protect yourself and others by buckling up and using child safety seats of properly. 

 

Until next time, spread the word and stay safe.

 

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preventing-eye-strain

 

Preventing Eye Strain
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While working in the digital age, it’s time to start thinking about taking better care of your eyes.
 

Eye strain is what happens when your eyes get tired from intense use; Like driving on a long trip, reading in low light, or staring hour after hour at a computer screen.

It's probably easy to think of a situation where you’ve dealt with the effects of eye strain.

The American Osteopathic Association reports that because more workers are spending more time in front of computer screens than ever before the side effects of eye strain including blurred vision, headaches, frequent blinking, and dry eyes are increasingly common.
 

Here are some simple tips to help protect you from eye strain:

 

Take Breaks - The best way to prevent eye strain is to decrease your exertion by only making your eyes work as hard as they need:

 

     
Taking regular rest breaks to relax your eyes is important.

 

 

    
Shift your focus from near to far on a regular basis. Shift focus from up close to at least 20 feet away.

 

 

     
If you're at your computer look out the window for a minute. 

 

 

     
If you're driving check your speedometer every so often. 

 

 

 

Reducing Glare - On your computer or TV screen will also dramatically reduce the strain on your eyes.

 

 

     
Use indirect or reflective lighting whenever possible. 

 

 

    
When you have to use a screen make sure it is at 90° angle from any direct light source. 

 

 

    
Try switching your monitor to flat screen technology. These reflect less light than the traditional curved monitors. 

 

 

    
Use anti-glare technology, like anti-glare filters on monitors or anti-glare glasses when driving. 

 

Adjust Contrast and Color - Appropriate contrast on your monitor or TV can make the edges of shapes and objects more discernible so the eyes don’t have to focus as much. However, too much contrast with the surrounding area will cause strain with your peripheral vision.

    
Use full spectrum lighting. Lighting, like sunlight, that covers the visible spectrum makes things easier to see. 

    
Adjust the color setting on monitors and screens, some even allow you to adjust the color temperature. 

   

Until next time, spread the word and stay safe.


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