Three Phoenix area firms fined for hazardous waste violations

Three Phoenix area firms fined for hazardous waste violations

Tempe, Goodyear and Casa Grande companies to pay $131,000
SAN FRANCISCO – Three Phoenix area companies were fined for violating state and federal hazardous waste laws, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today. In separate actions, the manufacturing and processing companies will pay penalties that total $131,000.

“We impose strict environmental controls to make sure hazardous waste is properly handled,” said Jared Blumenfeld, EPA’s Regional Administrator for the Pacific Southwest. “Worker safety and the health of nearby communities is our primary concern, but it’s also important to enforce against violators to prevent them from gaining an economic advantage over their competitors.”

EPA and Arizona Department of Environmental Quality inspectors found numerous hazardous waste violations during inspections in 2008 and 2009 at Acme Aerospace, AZZ Galvanizing Services, and Hexcel Corporation.

Tempe-based Acme Aerospace, currently under new management, designs and manufactures custom batteries and battery control electronic systems for military and commercial aircraft applications. Acme was fined $31,000. AZZ Galvanizing Services, the nation’s largest galvanizer, which “hot-dips” machinery to prevent corrosion at its Goodyear facility, was fined $79,700. Casa Grande-based Hexcel Corporation develops and manufactures composites for use in commercial aerospace, wind energy and industrial applications. Hexcel Corporation was fined $20,000.

During multiple inspections, EPA and ADEQ inspectors found the facilities violated hazardous waste laws in a variety of ways, including:
· Failing to maintain the facility to minimize the possibility of a release of hazardous waste to air, soil, or surface water which could threaten human health or contaminate the environment
· Failing to label containers of hazardous waste which increases the possibility of improper handling of the waste
· Failing to properly characterize wastes, which led to hazardous waste being disposed of in the general trash
· Failing to close containers of hazardous waste, which increases workers’ exposure to hazardous constituents, contributes to air pollution, and increases the likelihood of spills
· Failing to provide proper training, which increases workers’ risk of exposure and increases the possibility of improper management of the wastes
· Storing hazardous waste for over 90 days without a permit

The EPA’s Resource Conservation and Recovery Act program oversees the safe management and disposal of hazardous waste.
For more information on the RCRA program, please visit:

http://www.epa.gov/compliance/civil/rcra/index.html



4 comments (Add your own)

1. Riezke wrote:
I think the regulation falls under CLIA Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments. Parts of CLIA were very ncressaey to improve the quality of clinical labs, but parts were very onerous to the practicing private physician. Critics may say it hit us right in our wallets, and that is certainly true. If the centrifuge is to be used for clinical laboratory work, it has to be checked periodically to see that it performs to standard, for instance, that it spins at the rpm required. Since you do not intend to use the centrifuge for clinical work, there is the possibility you may get an exemption. (Don't get your hopes up; we're talking about the government here.) I suggest you call a local hospital or clinical lab, or even your doctor's office, and ask who oversees CLIA regulations in your area, then give them a call. There's an outside chance they might be helpful.Next, expect a visit from the CIA to make sure that you aren't trying to separate U-235 fro U-238. (Just kidding! Or, maybe not!)References :

Sun, April 8, 2012 @ 11:56 AM

2. Jeanjacques wrote:
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Sun, April 8, 2012 @ 11:56 AM

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Mon, April 9, 2012 @ 5:27 AM

4. Malik wrote:
I think the regulation falls under CLIA Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments. Parts of CLIA were very nescrsaey to improve the quality of clinical labs, but parts were very onerous to the practicing private physician. Critics may say it hit us right in our wallets, and that is certainly true. If the centrifuge is to be used for clinical laboratory work, it has to be checked periodically to see that it performs to standard, for instance, that it spins at the rpm required. Since you do not intend to use the centrifuge for clinical work, there is the possibility you may get an exemption. (Don't get your hopes up; we're talking about the government here.) I suggest you call a local hospital or clinical lab, or even your doctor's office, and ask who oversees CLIA regulations in your area, then give them a call. There's an outside chance they might be helpful.Next, expect a visit from the CIA to make sure that you aren't trying to separate U-235 fro U-238. (Just kidding! Or, maybe not!)References :

Mon, December 10, 2012 @ 4:07 AM

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